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Armistice Day in Wilmette, 1918

Father Edward J. Vattmann was a retired U.S. Army chaplain who lived at 1733 Lake Avenue in Wilmette. Active in local affairs, he was a familiar and well-loved figure around the village.  His close friend, Theodore Roosevelt, was known to pay a visit to him at that house on occasion. During World War I, Father Vattmann came out of retirement to serve at Fort Sheridan.

Groovy Threads

A guest blog post by Jane Textor, the Museum's Costume Curator:

Our current exhibit on the 1960s gave me the opportunity to display one of my favorite pieces housed here at the museum; a dress made of paper!  It has vivid colors, a psychedelic print, and it was worn right here in Wilmette.

Woman's Club of Wilmette

For 100 years and more, the Woman's Club of Wilmette at Tenth and Greenleaf has been a center of community life. On February 17, 2015, our village sustained a terrible loss when fire destroyed much of that historic and still vital building. The clubhouse, with its distinctive facing of Lannon limestone from Wisconsin, was built in 1929, incorporating a smaller building erected in 1912.

That's a lot of snow

The earliest Wilmette blizzard for which we have good records hit the village on Saturday, January 5, 1918, and even old-timers couldn't remember a worse one.  Snow fell for thirty continuous hours, as powerful winds whipped up huge eight-foot snowdrifts that blanketed the whole community.  All traffic shut down, and most people had no choice but to stay home.  An emergency call went out for me

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